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Lemieux KO’s Stevens in three

Lemieux KO’s Stevens in three
By: Bill Calogero – Ringside – March 11, 2017

Verona, NY – David Lemieux stopped Curtis Stevens with a devastating left in the third round of their scheduled 12-round middleweight fight, which was the main event of a great card from the Turning Stone Resort & Casino, broadcast on HBO.

The fireworks between Lemieux and Stevens started when the bell rang to start the first round. Both fighters landed hard shots on each other. Stevens seemed to have the tighter defense during the first and second rounds and looked like he was banking on taking Lemieux into the later rounds.

David Lemieux had other plans. Although he let his hands go freely during the first and most of the second, he began the third choosing his shots more carefully. Lemieux positioned Stevens against the ropes, threw a right hand, which Stevens tried to counter but David’s crushing left hook got to its target first, sending Curtis crumbling to the canvas, out cold. Referee Charlie Fitch waved it off immediately as Stevens lay motionless.

Curtis Stevens regained consciousness as he was removed from the ring on a stretcher.

The official time of the knockout was 1:59 of the third round. David Lemieux improves to 37-3 (33 KOs) and Curtis Stevens drops to 29-6 (21 KOs).

In the co-main event, Yuriorkis Gamboa won a ten-round unanimous decision over Rene Alvarado in a less than action-packed fight. Gamboa showed glimpses of excitement in the ring, letting his hands go, but for the most part, he fought a cautious fight against an opponent he should have had his foot firmly on the gas pedal.

Alvarado caught Yuriorkis with a shot that put him down in the final round, but it was a flash-knock-down and did not seem to be hurt Gamboa at all. In the end, two of the three judges scored the fight 97-92 and the third saw it 97-93 giving Gamboa the win. Yuriorkis Gamboa improves to 26-1 (17 KOs) and Rene Alvarado drops to 24-8 (16 KOs).

In undercard action:
Yves Ulysse won via a TKO when Zachary Ochoa’s corner stopped the fight at the end of the 7th round of their Super Lightweight contest. Ulysse improves to 13-0 (9 KOs) and Zachary Ochoa loses for the first time, dropping to 10-1 (7 KOs). Keep an eye on Yves Ulysse.

Diego De La Hoya won an eight-round decision over Roberto Pucheta to improve to 17-0 (9 KOs) in a Jr. Featherweight match-up. De La Hoya needs to step up his competetion, but then again, it looks like his team are well aware of his short-comings. In my opinion, a fighter at 16 or 17 and 0 should have taken care of Pucheta prior to the final bell.  De La Hoya has a long way to go.

D’Mitrius Ballard stopped Zoltan Sera at 1:16 of the 4th round in their Super Middleweight bout to improve to 16-0 (12 KOs). Zoltan Sera drops to 26-12 (17 KOs).

Alex Rincon made his pro debut a successful one by stopping Shaun Lee Henson with a body shot at 52 seconds of the second round in their middleweight fight. Rincon is now 1-0 (1 KO) and Henson drops to 3-3 (2 KOs).

Damon Allen Jr. improved to 11-0-1 (5 KOs) by stopping Adam Mate at 1:05 of the second round of their lightweight fight. Mate drops to 24-11 (17 KOs).

Todd Unthank-May and Quinton Rankin fought to a split DRAW decision in their light-heavyweight contest. Unthank-May is now 10-0-1 (4 KOs) and Rankin 12-3-2 (9 KOs).

Another great night of boxing at the Turning Stone.

Boxing Loses a Legend -Hall of Fame Trainer and Manager Lou Duva passes at age 94

Boxing Loses a Legend -Hall of Fame Trainer and Manager Lou Duva passes at age 94

By: Daxx Khan – March 9, 2017
It was with deep sorrow to hear another one of boxing’s greats, Hall of Famer Lou Duva passed away March 8th at age 94. Starting in 1963, after Joey Giardiello his first champion defeated Dick Tiger for the middleweight title, Duva worked almost four decades, guiding not only some of the modern eras but boxings all-time greats.
As a trainer, Lou worked with world champions and title challengers, Pernell Whitaker, Evander Holyfield, Mark Breland, Vinny Pazienza, Meldrick Taylor, Jose Luis Lopez, Michael Moorer, Alex Arthur, Tyrell Biggs and Andrew Golota. As a Manager, Duva guided Johnny Bumphus, Rocky Lockridge, Shaun George and multi-division title holder Zab Judah towards success.
He was more than one of boxing’s most successful trainers and managers, he was one of its larger than life figures. I believe Lou Duva, might be the only manager and trainer whose own memorable moments, equal that of his fighters.
Who could ever forget the time, Lou went at it with Roger Mayweather after his win over Vinny Pazienza?  The referee might have turned a blind eye to Mayweather hitting Pazienza late, that didn’t mean Lou was letting it go.  It might have temporarily cost him his manager’s license and $750 dollars but he put boxing on notice. “Lou Duva doesn’t take guff from anyone”.
It wasn’t just his fighter’s opponents, promoters, trainers and referees were also confronted if they crossed Duva or his fighters. When Mike Tyson stopped Lou’s fighter Tyrell Biggs, Tysons promoter Don King mocked Biggs and Duva from ringside. His comments infuriated Lou, he went after King, looking to dish out his own punishment, security guards would stop him just feet before King was in reach.
The most famous or perhaps infamous public moment, involving Duva came on July 11th 1996, that was the night Andrew Golota and Riddick Bowe met for the first time. When Golota was disqualified for low blows, a mini-riot ensued. The commotion caused his defibrillator to go off, he was taken from the ring on a stretcher, in what could be best described as a “Micky Goldmill” moment. It was a real life Rocky 3 situation.  
Those were just a few of many, Lou Duva moments. Was he a bit extreme? At times, yes, no debating that fact, one thing was for certain though. If you were with Lou Duva, he had your back, even if it meant taking on all comers.

While he was a larger than life figure, he was also that guy we seen a little of ourselves in, Duva had that “Fella from the Neighborhood” persona we could relate to. The fact we seen him down, yet refuse to stay down on multiple occasions, made him all the more likable. Even during his worst moments.
In his 94 years, Lou Duva lived a long full life. During his years in the sport, we watched Lou call it as he seen it. There were many times, when Lou should have thought things through before reacting. Yet he was the type guy who, always did what he felt was right “Now” and always with the best interest of his fighters. Whatever consequences might follow, could be dealt with later. That’s what separated him from everyone else in the business. It’s what made Lou Duva one of boxings greats.
In an era, where people seem more worried about “Consequences” then what’s right, we could use a few dozen more, Lou Duva types in boxing today. If anything, just to point fingers when the “Powers that be” fail at doing their job. Let’s hope now, he can sit with other past greats of the sport, look down and say “They are doing it right”. He did his part in helping lay the foundation, it’s up to the new generation to capitalize and do him proud.

World Boxing Entertainment – David Haye Gets KO’d

World Boxing Entertainment – David Haye Gets KO’d

By: Johnston Brown – March 5, 2017

On Saturday night at the o2 Arena in London, Greenwich we were treated to an entertaining night of action. Ohara Davies set the tone nicely when he entered the ring against Derry Matthews to The Undertakers theme music. Not that his performance was anything WWE like but the main event of the evening not only lived up to the wrestling entertainment value but it gave us even more.

For some reason this fight caught the imagination of the British public from the moment Tony Bellew called out David Haye, after knocking out BJ Flores in his first defence of the WBC Cruiserweight title. With Haye the number one contender for the WBO Heavyweight crown at the time, I did not think he would accept. But I should have known better when it comes to David ‘my little toe’ Haye as he jumped at the chance to fight the smaller guy.

The week long build up to the fight was painful to watch and listen to but credit where credit is due, Sky Sports, Eddie Hearn, David Haye and Tony Bellew sold the fight out in minutes.

On the Wednesday before the fight the press leaked that David Haye had been spotted in Munich with a suspected Achilles tendon injury. Haye rubbished the rumours stating that he was fully fit and the fight would still go ahead.

In the first round Bellew connected with the better shots and slipped some wild Haye punches that threw him off balance. In rounds two and three Haye used his jab and tried to throw some big right hands that Bellew took and avoided well. But Haye had his best round in the fourth when he landed a hurtful right-left combination.

Into the fifth and it seemed like Bellew was starting to open up as Haye continued to land his jab to the body and looked dangerous with Bellew on the ropes.

Then in the sixth round the drama unfolded, as Haye seemed to slip after a Bellew right hand. You could see that he was having problems with what looked like his knee? Bellew jumped on Haye for the knock out and eventually he put the 36 year down but he rose to his feet and survived the Evertonian’s onslaught.

Shane McGuigan advised Haye to stay on the ropes for round seven and try to counter the inevitable Bellew pressure. The round ended completely one sided as left and rights continued to connect throughout with hardly any punches coming back from Haye.

With Haye unable to stand up straight and walking around like he’s had far too many cocktails at his Miami training camp, the scouser looked for the defining blow in round eight. Haye had his hands down by his side while the cruiserweight tried to capitalise but he looked slow and tiered probably due to the extra weight he was carrying.

The ninth was surprisingly easier for the Londoner as Bellew threw little more than a jab as he seemed to reserve his energy for the last two rounds. The most eventful moment of the round was a cheap shot to the crown jewels of Tony Bellew.

In round ten Shane McGuigan taped up the Londoners ankle not that it helped as he continued to stumble around the ring. Bellews reserved energy helped him sustain the pressure a little more then the previous round but he was unable to end the fight. Haye landed a dangerous left hand that reminded the scouser that he can still win with one leg.

Into the eleventh round Haye attempted to hit Bellew with a left jab but ended up on the floor. Soon after getting back to his feet Bellew finally connected with a shot to the top of the head that sent Haye through the ropes. He valiantly beat the count and got back to his feet but his corner had seen enough and threw in the towel. Tony Bellew wins with an 11th round TKO.

This has to be one of the biggest upsets in British Boxing history and surely ends David Haye’s career. Even if he does make a return for the rematch, I’m sure the £4m he made from the £7m pot will go a long way to soothing his massive ego.

A lot of the press and social media have portrayed this fight as a massive Heavyweight match up and a lot of the British fans have bought into it. I on the other hand have to disagree.

David Haye will get plaudits for managing to fight on with only one leg but I can’t help but be sceptical of his injury. It was his little toe for the Klitschko fight, his shoulder for the fight that never happened against Tyson Fury and now the Achilles tendon? Yes it may have been as it seemed but for me he’s like the little boy that cried wolf.

Tony Bellew should now concentrate on defending his WBC cruiserweight title before he’s stripped. Instead of even thinking about fighting anyone like Deontay Wilder, not that I think the heavyweight isn’t beatable but his big right hand would flatten Bellew.

I just want to make an honourable mention to Derry Mathews who announced his retirement after his loss to Ohara Davies. He really has been a great servant to British boxing and I wish him all the best for the future.

On the undercards
Cruiserweight Jake Bonallie (1-0) bt Craig Glover (2-1-0) on Pts
Super Welterweight Ted Cheeseman (8-0) bt Jack Sellars (5-1-1) on Pts
Heavyweight Dave Allen (11-2-1) bt David Howe (12-5-0) by KO in Rd 2
Featherweight Lee Selby (24-1-0) bt Andoni Gago (16-3-2) by TKO in Rd 9
WBC Silver Super Lightweight Ohara Davies (15-0) bt Derry Mathews (38-12-2) by TKO in Rd 2
Welterweight Sam Eggington (20-3-0) bt Paulie Malignaggi (38-8-0) by KO in Rd 9

My two penny’s worth

My two penny’s worth

By: Johnston Brown – March 3, 2017

I have been a boxing fan since the early nineties and was lucky enough to have witnessed some epic battles. Most notably the two Chris Eubank vs Neil Benn fights. In fact it was the first encounter between these two on November 18, 1990 that sticks in the memory the most. My late brother was so excited about the fight and the possibility of Eubank losing his ‘O’ that he filled me in with all the details beforehand. It was a week before my eighth Birthday so I remember trying to retain as much info as I possibly could. As I watched the fight, I remember going through all the emotions that you can only get when watching boxing while my brother and I cheered on Benn to beat the cocky but classy Eubank. When Benn was stopped in the ninth round I remember having that awful gut wrenching feeling of disappointment. Like the one I had, when I saw England lose their World Cup Semi-Final to Germany on penalties in the summer of that year. It didn’t matter that Benn lost because the fight was great entertainment and the public demanded a rematch albeit three years later. I learned as an eight year old that you can lose in sport and still come away a hero, like Benn and England in 1990.

Somewhere along the line boxing has lost the losing hero. A guy that loses today loses more than just a fight; he loses his creditability and is deemed a failure. He can no longer be considered better than the other guy who is undefeated. Therefore the modern fighter does not want to put their undefeated records on the line so they fight weaker opposition.
The trouble is a lot of the younger generation are buying into it which causes confusion. I feel sorry for the young fan that is watching boxing, as I did all those years ago and never experiencing or understanding defeat. If you think of all the Mayweather fans that grew up watching him through their childhood and into adulthood, they will think he is the best fighter that ever lived because he remained undefeated. Irrespective of whom he fought towards the back end of his career and how carefully he cherry picked his opponents. He is the sweet science in their eyes and nothing will change that.

But there is hope in 2017! We have already been treated to two cracking unification fights this year with another one this Saturday night between Danny ‘Swift’ Garcia and Keith ‘One Time’ Thurman. Then we have Golovkin vs Jacobs at the end of the month and Joshua vs Klitchsko in April. Plus, Brook vs Spence and Khan vs Pacquiao coming up before the summer. That would be six super fights within only five months which is completely unheard of in modern day boxing.

Maybe the retirement of Mayweather has improved the sport and opened a new chapter in boxing. I hope that in 8 years’ time from now I can get my son as excited about a big fight as I my brother did in 1990.

In memory of my late brother Jason Brown: 08/10/1974 – 25/11/2015 RIP

Results From England

Results From England

By: Johnston Brown – February 25, 2017

 

Gavin McDonnell vs Rey Vargas
On Saturday night at the Ice Arena in Hull, Gavin McDonnell who was trying to make British Boxing history when he challenged Rey Vargas for the vacant WBC Super-Bantamweight title. Gavin in his first World title fight was hoping to join twin brother and WBA Bantamweight champion Jamie as a World champion, which would make them the first British twins to achieve such a remarkable feat.

In his way was a young Mexican fighter that had only ever fought away from home twice, on both occasions in California. So on a cold and dreary night in the Ice Arena in Hull, England maybe Gavin McDonnell could upset the odds by taking Vargas out of his comfort zone.

Gavin is a pressure fighter that shows pure grit in every fight and has an incredible gas tank but it was the classy Vargas that started the better. As expected Gavin tried to take the fight to the 26 year old Mexican but his clever movement and slick combinations made it difficult for the Yorkshireman to get in close and upset the Vargas rhythm.

The first half of the fight was dominated by Vargas who slipped out of trouble with his quick footwork and landed heavy blows continuously to the head and body using his hand speed. Although McDonnell stood his ground better in rounds two and three with some good punches he could not stop Vargas from taking a substantial lead in the opening rounds.

In the fifth round of the fight McDonnell upped the pressure and tried to get inside and ruff up Vargas. But frustration and over eagerness started to creep in, as he grabbed Vargas by the back of the head and pushed him down to the canvas. Fortunately for McDonnell the referee was in a lenient mood and instead gave Vargas a warning for a low blow.

Vargas threw a terrific uppercut in the seventh which bloodied McDonnell’s nose and was probably the most one sided round by the Mexican. McDonnell struck back in the eighth but by this point he needed a small miracle.

McDonnell’s seconds called for one last push when they told him he needed the knock out if he was to win the title. It definitely made a difference as he fought the closing stages of the fight like his life depended on it. The looping right hand connected a few times on Vargas’s chin to the delight of the home fans but none of them put Vargas in any significant danger.

So it went to the judges scorecards which read 114-114, 117-111, 116-112 in favour of the excellent Vargas. I think the crowd must have effected Ian John-Lewis decision to score the fight a draw, as Vargas was the deserved victor.

I also scored the fight 116-112 and was very impressed with Rey Vargas. To travel overseas and take on an undefeated fighter on his home turf and perform the way he did shows real character. I’m disappointed for Gavin McDonnell who is a great guy that wears his heart on his sleeve but just came up short against a better fighter.

Also on the card was Luke Campbell who looked in good shape and produced wonderful knockout with a left hand uppercut. Campbell now goes 16-1 and is now eyeing a rematch with Yvan Mendy in an attempt to avenge the only defeat on his record. Tommy Coyle who is always great to watch won by a third round knockout against Rakeem Noble in an eventful fight from start to finish and goes 23-4

Jay Harris vs Thomas Essomba – York Hall
On Friday night, Jay Harris made it a perfect 10 as he won the Commonwealth flyweight title by beating Thomas Essomba at York Hall in Bethnal Green.
The Swansea campaigner took a unanimous points decision to end the reign of the former African Games gold medallist. It took Harris’s unbeaten record as a professional into double figures, but it was the manner of his victory that was most impressive against Essomba.
The Cameroonian who now lives in Sunderland had world-title aspirations last year and was seen as a dangerous customer who could trouble the best.
But Harris boxed superbly throughout, showing durability and enough class to impress the judges. It was never easy and Essomba did unleash a number of stinging punches, but Harris replied with every shot and there was no doubt about the winner of a fight of serious quality. The scores were 117-112, 116-113, 115-114 in the Welsh fighter’s favour.

War Hollywood Style- Berchelt stops Vargas, Miura halts Roman in Indio

War Hollywood Style- Berchelt stops Vargas, Miura halts Roman in Indio

By: Daxx Khan – January 29, 2017
We were treated to a rare night of boxing this past Saturday, the two powerhouse networks, Showtime and HBO went head to head with quality, relevant cards. While Showtime entertained fans with their card in Las Vegas, In Indio California on HBO, Francisco Vargas, Miguel Berchelt, Takashi Miura and Miguel Roman paid tribute to Hollywood by delivering wars only seen on the big screen.
What took place on HBO, between the four fighters left some fans in awe, others wondering “Why would they subject themselves to such punishment”? They were the type bouts, we look back upon in a decade and say “How did they stay on their feet”?
In the main event, perhaps boxings most exciting fighter Francisco Vargas, looked to defend his WBC super featherweight title against unknown challenger Miguel Berchelt. With little being known about Berchelt, other than an opponent list based entirely in Mexico and he had some power as his 27 stoppage wins indicated. Many felt he might have early success, before the experience of Vargas, would take Berchelt deep, wear him down and move onto bigger things. The challenger had different plans for the night.
The champion started fast, using combinations to confuse Berchelt who did land some hard shots with little effect. In the second, third and fourth rounds, Vargas stunned Berchelt who in return instead of taking steps backwards, answered back, opening cuts on Vargas nose and over his left eye.
They went to war from the fifth round on, combination punches from Vargas paused Berchelt who in return, would pin Vargas on the ropes and punish him. As the second half of the fight started, Berchelt never having fought such a ferocious battle seemed to begin tiring. The champion Vargas began swelling to a grotesque degree.
The punches of Vargas to landed clean, yet lacked power to hold off a younger larger Berchelt who pushed forward and threw every punch with authority. A bloody Vargas continued his volume pace, hoping Miguel would eventually slow down.
The size, power and youth of Berchelt, would overcome Vargas experience and will. In the eleventh round, bloody abused and looking for a miracle comeback, Vargas would suffer his first career loss when Raul Caiz Jr rescued him from further punishment. At the 2:19 mark of the round, after a great performance by both men, Miguel Berchelt claimed his first world title and spot among the sports top tier improving to 31-1 (28). In his first loss Francisco Vargas now stands at 23-1-2 (17).
The co-feature between Takashi Miura and Miguel Roman, was an even more brutal battle of wills and attrition. It was pressure against accuracy, just as one fighter seemed to have the edge, his opponent would rally and take control. The cleaner shots of Miura, would be stifled by Roman who pressed his way inside and let loose combinations.
At the mid-way point, Takashi Miura swollen and battle worn, was asked by his corner “Can You win are you OK?”, undeterred Miura responded by shaking his head “Yes”. When the bell rang, he would let loose all he had in his arsenal. The barrage hurt Roman, who then unleashed a body shot, taking momentum away from Miura, knocking his mouth piece out.
A strong ninth round for Miura, ended with Roman landing five-punch unanswered punches. At the start of round ten, Miura changed his game plan. With the clean, flush head shots, landing on Roman not having their desired result, Miura turned his focused to the body with an immediate pay off.
A straight right hand in the tenth, delivered to the center of Roman’s mid-section, dropped and sent him reeling on the canvas. He amazingly made it to his feet and continued not only fighting but applied pressure to Miura. It would happen again in the eleventh round, a body shot landed flush by Takashi, dropping Roman who beat the count and went right into the danger zone.
When the final round started, both Miura and Roman looked as though they had reenacted a Hollywood movie. They circled slowly, hematomas were over both eyes of Miura, Roman tried to protect his midsection. A final flurry from Miura, caught Roman clean, sending him down a third time at the forty-three second mark. With the look in his eyes saying “Get up”, his body saying “Stay Down”, that bout would end officially at the 53 second mark.
After a jaw dropping war, one that could rival any in the last two decades, Takashi Miura with his stoppage of Miguel Roman improves to 31-3-2 (24). With nothing to hold his head down about, Miguel Roman now stands at 56-12 (43).   
In Undercard action-
Super Welterweight-Sadam Ali 24-1 (14) def.  Jorge Silva 22-13-2 (18) via TKO 3.
Super Featherweight- Lamont Roach 13-0 def. Alejandro Valdez 26-9-2 via KO 1.
Bantamweight- Cesar Diaz 4-0 def. Joel Castro 0-2 via KO 2.
Super Lightweight- Vicente Portillo 6-0 def.  Mike Melikyan 1-2 via MD 4.
Super Lightweight-Vergil Ortiz 4-0 def. Israel Villela 5-4 via. TKO 1.
Featherweight- Luis Coria 3-0 def. Gerardo Molina 1-4 via TKO 1.

James DeGale and Badou Jack deliver in Brooklyn

James DeGale and Badou Jack deliver in Brooklyn

By: Daxx Khan – January 15, 2017

Saturday night in Brooklyn, the first major card of 2017 took place on Showtime, with three action packed world title bouts, headlined by a 168lb unification bout between, IBF title holder James DeGale and WBC champion Badou Jack.

With four common opponents, winning their titles, a month apart in 2015, each against a Dirrell brother, Jack and DeGale were on an unavoidable collision course. When they met Saturday, fans hoped, this bout would decide “Who is the best Super Middleweight in Boxing”. The champions, did their best to provide that answer, neither gave into the moment and put on their best career performance to date.
They would trade knockdowns, Jack went down in the first and DeGale the twelfth. The footwork of DeGale, kept Jack at a distance, using crisp clean left hands to snap Jack’s head back. When he closed the distance, Jack and his trademark body work punished DeGale, draining his energy. Even referee Arthur Mercante Jr, took punishment when an accidental hook from Jack, rocked him at the closing of round five.

With a steady eleven rounds behind them, both men exhausted looking to edge out the win, they closed the twelfth with non-stop action, bringing those in attendance at the Barclay’s center on their feet. It was a rare fight, where you wanted neither man to lose, because neither deserved a loss after their efforts.

When the scores were read, two of the three judges agree with that opinion. Judges Julie Lederman and Steve Weisfeld scored it 113-113, Glenn Feldman scored it 114-112, in favor of James DeGale making it a Majority Draw. With each man retaining his title, Badou Jack now stands at 20-1-3 (12), James DeGale 23-1-1 (14).

In the co-feature, IBF World super featherweight title holder Jose Pedraza, took on unbeaten Gervonta Davis. It was a dominating performance for the 22yr old challenger, while Pedraza managed to put Davis out of his comfort zone, he was never able to sustain momentum. The power and speed of Davis, caught up with Pedraza in the seventh round, when he was dropped in the corner. After barely beating the count, Pedraza would be pinned on the ropes and needed saving by referee Ricky Gonzalez moments later.

In his first loss Jose Pedraza now stands at 22-1 (12), Gervonta Davis along with his first world title improves to 17-0 (16).

When undefeated middleweights, Levgen Khytrov and Immanuwel Aleem stepped between the ropes, fans were treated to another war. It started and ended in dramatic fashion, Aleem almost closed the show in round one, battering Khytrov all over the ring. He would be on the receiving end in round two, after punching himself out, Khytrov would batter him non-stop. The momentum swayed back and forth for the duration, Aleem hurting Khytrov, punching himself out then absorbing every bit of what he dished out.

The affair would end in round six, after Aleem landed a huge blow that Khytrov was unable to recover from. Immanuwel Aleem improved to 17-0-1 (10) and claimed the vacant WBC Silver middleweight title, Khytrov in his first loss stands at 14-1 (12).

In her first WBO female super bantamweight title defense, Amanda Serrano took on former two division title holder Yazmin Rivas. It was an all action bout, with neither lady taking a moments rest. While Rivas was game, she could not overcome the size and power advantage of Amanda. After nine rounds of non-stop action, they finished by trading for two entire minutes, proving once again the females can deliver in terms of action.

The final scores read 99-91, 98-92 and 97-93 all in favor of Serrano who improves to 31-1-1 (23), Yazmin Rivas now stands at 35-10-1 (10).

Make sure to listen to our Post-Fight show by visiting our YouTube Channel, hear what everyone from the TalkinBoxing with Billy C show and fans had to say. https://www.youtube.com/user/talkinboxing

In Undercard action-
Heavyweight- Adam Kownacki 15-0 (12) def. Joshua Tufte 19-2 (9) via TKO2.

Welterweight- Thomas Dulorme 24-2 (16) def. Brian Jones 13-7 (7) TKO6.

Welterweight- Noel Murphy 8-0 (2) def. Maxito Sainvil 4-1-1 (2) via UD.

Welterweight- Kenny Robles 1-0 def. Latorie Woodberry 1-3-1 via UD

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Boxing at the Barclay’s- Will the Standard for 2017 be Set?

Boxing at the Barclay’s- Will the Standard for 2017 be Set?

By: Daxx Khan – January 9, 2017
At the end of 2016, NYSAC with their newly implemented insurance requirements, had boxing in New York at a standstill. That didn’t stop the UFC, boxing’s biggest competitor in terms of popularity. The organization, not only met NYSAC’s insurance requirements, they sold out Madison Square Garden, in record time. On January 14th at the Barclays Center, Mayweather promotions and DiBella Entertainment, join forces for the first major card of 2017. If all goes well, the event could not only reboot boxing in New York, it will set the bar, in terms of standards for 2017.
The main event between, WBC title holder Badou Jack and IBF champion James DeGale, could be the divisions most significant showdown, since boxing’s “Super Six” tournament. They are similar in age, Jack at thirty-three years and DeGale thirty, each has a slight physical advantage over the other, yet neither is enough to tip the scales in either fighter’s favor.  DeGale an inch in reach and Jack an inch in height. As both seek their third world title defense, the path that brought them here is similar.
They possess four common opponents, George Groves, Lucian Bute, Marco Antonio Periban and Rogelio Medina with mixed results. The duo even won their titles, a month apart, in the same year and against a Dirrell brother. In May of 2015 James DeGale defeated Andre for the vacant IBF title, in April 2015 Badou Jack defeated Anthony for the WBC belt.
Having two world class champions, taking part in a fight of this caliber, minus an extended build-up, delays due to contract negotiations, tune ups and postponements, speaks volumes on the efforts of both promoters. The other two world title fights scheduled, hold just as much and possibly even more fan appeal.
The nights co-feature, an IBF super featherweight title showdown, between undefeated champion Jose Pedraza and undefeated challenger Gervonta Davis, is the type of bout that’s virtually unheard of these days. While the title at stake obviously holds value, what follows for both fighters win or lose, so long as they produce a quality bout, will be the real reward. As of right now, despite one holding a title belt and both being undefeated, neither fighter is a mainstream attraction. There are two other men at the weight, Vasyl Lomachenko and Francisco Vargas, who are not only mainstream names, they will be seeking opponents sooner than later. One is arguably boxing’s best fighter pound for pound, the other its most exciting. Should either Pedraza or Davis, be mentioned as possible opponents either, their careers will automatically reach new heights. Even if a fight against Lomachenko or Vargas never takes place.
Last summer at the Barclays center, Heather Hardy and Shelly Vincent, gave fans a new appreciation for female boxing. On Saturday two other ladies will step into the ring, looking to duplicate or surpass of Hardy and Vincent’s performance. In a female “Puerto Rico vs Mexico” rivalry, Amanda Serrano defends her WBO female super bantamweight title against, multi-division world champion Yazmin Rivas. These two fighters are examples, of the best in female boxing, neither have delivered a disappointing performance before and I highly doubt this weekend will be any different.
In the spring, Gennady Golovkin and Daniel Jacobs will meet in a middleweight unification bout, Saturdays showdown between, Levgen Khytrov and Immanuwel Aleem, should interest them both. They are two hard hitting undefeated middleweights, looking to claim the vacant WBC Silver middleweight title. Whoever wins between these two, is in position to face whoever comes out on top between Jacobs and Golovkin. While they might not be well known, I can assure you neither should be taken lightly.
Throw in the return, of a very popular Thomas Dulorme, a heavyweight showdown and three undefeated upstarts, next Saturday is a stacked card from top to bottom. Exactly how much quality is involved? The best way to determine, is going behind the numbers and looking a bit deeper at the eighteen fighters. In total, there are five, current or former world champions, one former world title challenger and eight of the eighteen fighters are undefeated. Their combined resumes, total 264-23-8, with 149 of those wins coming by knockout.  
In 2016 boxing took a beating, with Pay-Per-View sales to enforce the opinion, next week’s card in Brooklyn could be the beginning of a bounce back year. It might even happen without Pay-Per-View.

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