Author: Daxx Khan

Daxx Khan has been a regular member of the Talkin Boxing with Billy C TV & Radio Show since 2011, throughout his over two decades involved with the sport of boxing he has covered over 150 world title fights across the globe and written for multiple major sporting news outlets. The first world title fight he covered was in 1991 while still attending NYU when he accompanied boxing media Icon Bert Sugar to the "Terrible" Terry Norris versus "Sugar" Ray Leonard WBC Super Welterweight title fight which Norris won by wide unanimous decision. Daxx is also former USA Boxing Coach and representative for "The World Boxing Federation".

WBC NEWS – Oubaali named champion in recess due to testing positive for “Covid 19” Donaire to face Rodriguez for title

WBC World Bantamweight Champion Nordine Oubaali was scheduled to make a mandatory defense of his title on December 19, 2020, against Number 1 WBC-rated boxer Nonito Donaire.  Due to Champion Oubaali’s positive Covid-19 test result in late October, the WBC has placed Champion Oubaali as WBC World Champion In-Recess, and approved a bout between Number 1 Donaire and Number 4 Emmanuel Rodriguez for the title.

The WBC wishes to clarify the status of the WBC Bantamweight Division and WBC World Champion Nordine Oubaali, in light of the WBC’s designation of WBC World Champion Oubaali as Champion In-Recess, pursuant to the governing WBC Rules & Regulation.

1. As WBC World Champion In Recess, Champion Oubaali is, remains and will remain WBC World Champion.

2. Champion Oubaali now enjoys the designation of WBC World Champion “In-Recess.”  That designation in no way diminishes the WBC’s recognition, or Champion Oubaali’s status, as WBC World Champion.  In fact, the World Champion In-Recess designation elevates his status to a higher level by conferring to Champion Oubaali additional privileges he did not enjoy before.

a. Champion Oubaali will not have a pre-set deadline to return to the ring without losing his World Champion Status.  Instead, his return will be driven by the WBC’s and the local commission’s specific medical requirements for cases like his.

b. Champion Oubaali will return to the ring as the fully recognized returning WBC World Champion and will be allowed, if he so chooses, to make a defense of his title in a voluntary contest, to get back in the ring and prepare for the mandatory fight.

3. With respect to Champion Oubaali’s future mandatory bout with the winner of the Donaire vs. Rodriguez bout, consistent with the WBC Rules & Regulations, the WBC will start a new free negotiations period.  If the parties do not come to an agreement within that period, then the WBC will schedule a new purse offer ceremony, with a purse split stipulation of 60/40 in favor of Champion Oubaali.

4. If Champion Oubaali chooses to make a voluntary defense in February of 2021, then the winner of Donaire vs. Rodriguez must fight Champion Oubaali without any intervening bout (assuming Champion Oubaali wins his  voluntary defense).  If for any reason, Champion Oubaali requests a date after February of 2021 to make a voluntary defense, then the WBC will evaluate the timing of the mandatory bout to make sure that Champion Oubaali will be available to fight within the same timeframe as the winner of the Donaire vs. Rodriguez bout.

Mauricio Sulaimán, WBC President

USA Boxing Alumni’s 1992 USA Trials virtual reunion a major KO

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (November 24, 2020) – USA Boxing and the USA Boxing Alumni Association recently held a virtual reunion via Zoom for competitors at the 1992 USA Boxing Trials, including a pair of 1992 USA Olympians, Raul Marquez and Montell Griffin.

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (November 24, 2020) – USA Boxing and the USA Boxing Alumni Association recently held a virtual reunion via Zoom for competitors at the 1992 USA Boxing Trials, including a pair of 1992 USA Olympians, Raul Marquez and Montell Griffin.
The group was comprised of 19 fighters who competed at the 1992 USA Olympic Trials, plus a few administrators, who happily spoke non-stop for an hour and 45 minutes. They gleefully reminisced, shared personal updates from the past 22 years, remembered their most memorable experiences as amateur boxers, and even got emotional at times as they rebounded. Some have kept in touch through emails and social media, but visibly seeing each other on the Zoom call was eye-opening for these ring brothers.
“You all are part of USA Boxing,” said call host Mike McAtee, Executive Director of USA Boxing. “Hector Colon and Raul Marquez got their brothers on this call. It was a natural fit. We have 13 kids getting ready to qualify in May for the Olympics. USA Boxing touches 36,000 kids every day. It changed our lives, and we can have an impact saving lives.
“It’s an honor seeing you all. You are the backbone of USA Boxing. Boxing made us who we are, you have inspired boxers. This was long overdue, and we plan to have reunions with other Olympic Trials classes in the future.”
“This is very cool to see everybody and I enjoy listening to you,” added Chris Cugliari, USA Boxing Alumni Association Director. “You’re all helping bring the spirit back to USA Boxing Alumni. Boxing people love being around boxing people, and that’s what the USA Boxing Alumni Association is all about. We’re bringing that spirit back. I love having you guys in our alumni program. This has been a blast!”
“I’m not much of a boxer, but I’m happy to be part of this boxing program,” commented Barry Siff, USA Boxing volunteer marketing advisor. “I grew up in Detroit during the 1980’s and hung out at Kronk (Gym). I’m happy to be on this call. We all need to help Mike and the team going forward. Don’t wait until 2028 in Los Angeles. We have Tokyo next year and Paris in 2024. Kids can learn from you. I’m happy to be part of USA Boxing.”
 
 
USA Boxing Alumni Association
Created to champion lifelong, mutually beneficial relationships between USA Boxing and its alumni, –boxers, officials, coaches and boxing fans — The Alumni Association connects generations of champions, inspiring and giving back to USA Boxing’s future boxing champions, in and out of the ring.
The USA Boxing Alumni Association is open to anyone who has a love for boxing and would like to stay connected with amateur boxing. Members are granted access to a wide variety of special events hosted by the Alumni Association, including its annual USA Boxing Alumni Association Hall of Fame reception.
To join the Alumni Association, simply register at alumni@usaboxing.org for a $40.00 per year membership fee. New members will receive a T-shirt, keychain and e-wallet.
FIGHTERS’ QUOTES
(Robert Allen and Tarick Salmaci were also on the call but unable to speak due to technical problems)
HECTOR COLON: “I love you guys. It’s been so long. I hope we can communicate like this more often. We need you all to support USA Boxing and USA Boxing Alumni. My first international fight was in Barbados and I knocked out my opponent in 26 seconds. I remember receiving the Adidas bag and shoes. It was such a special thing. I dreamed of making the Olympics and I should have, but I found God calling me away from the sport. I was proud watching you and I rooted for you.
“It’s great to be back in USA Boxing and giving back to USA Boxing, because it helped me become the person I am today. I could have gone the wrong way. Let’s do this again and keep giving back to our sports.”
RAUL MARQUEZ: “I’m very excited to be here. I feel honored and I’m probably the only one here who fought most of the guys here. I have a lot of memories. I’m honored to be here with you, my boxing family. It’s beautiful.
“Everybody here knows how hard it is to win a tournament. We know what it takes because we were all elite. We have to give back. I’m still involved in boxing.”
ORLANDO HARRIS: “I had the greatest time in USA Boxing. I started late. I fought once before I went into the military. I got better and learned how to fight in the military. I had to because I had to do good or go back to my unit. In ’04 I got into car accident. Everybody died but me. They say I’m disabled, but I’m not, I still coach boxing.”
PAULIE AYALA: “The ’92 Olympic Trials is my most memorable moment because I was there. In 1988, I lost in The Westerns in the semifinals and I left boxing. I wasn’t focused. I watched you people excel and didn’t fight again until 1992. I lost to Sergio (Reyes), who I had fought 16 times before that fight. I met a lot of you guys fighting in Russia. What’s inspiring is listening to all of you.”
MONTELL GRIFFIN: “I was late going to the rty, coming in 1991. I had two fights going into the Golden Gloves, but I lied and said I had 12 so I could fight in the opens. My first fight was in 1991. I had to fight the No. 1 guy, Jeremy Williams, to make the Olympic team. Those 1 ½ years as were the best of my life. I looked up to all of you guys and have respect for all.”
ANTWUN ECHOLS: “I made it to Team USA, and I was an Olympic alternate. Raul (Marquez), he likes to talk, and I was excited to fight him. I learned a lot. I love being with all the guys. Larry Nicholson took me under his wing. He talked to me daily. I was a young kid, and my family life wasn’t good. When I went to the ’92 championships, these people were my family.
“I was raw off the streets of Davenport (Iowa) and Larry took care of me…thank you. If it wasn’t for the people at the Olympic Center, I don’t know where I’d be today.”
DANNY RIOS: “In 1992, I lost in the semifinals of the US Championships. So, I had to win the Golden Gloves to go to the Olympics. At the Trials I won my first fight and lost my second. I later turned pro. I’m working security and helping to train fighters at a local gym. I hope to have my own gym. I’m glad to see you all after all these years.
SKIPPER KELP: “I’m in Vegas. I moved here when I was in the amateurs. The best thing was the camaraderie. We grew up together. Together, we came of age as teenagers and I met some of my best friends for life. We were all at the elite level, the best versus the best, and eventually we fought each other. I met a lot of guys in 1989 in Russia.
“I own Fight Capital Gym in Las Vegas. When you go to Vegas, call me and come to my gym. We have a brotherhood for life. Amateur boxing brings people together. To reconnect like this is awesome.”
DANELL NICHOLSON: “My most memorable moment was representing USA Boxing at the 1992 Olympics, because I became an Olympian and met all these great athletes. Meeting you is really my most memorable. You can’t beat boxing!”
RONALD SIMMS: “I was probably on the amateur team longer than anybody. I stayed on so long that I have a lot of memories. I was part of the 1988, 1992 and 1996 Olympic teams. I saw a lot of talent come through. I started in 1995; this sport is addictive and I’m still involved in amateur boxing. We still have the most talented kids in amateur boxing.
“My dream was to make the Olympic Team and I still haven’t made it. My goal was to be No. 1 and I was in 1995. Then, I wanted to quit, but my coach said it wasn’t the time. The lessons I learned from you guys and sharing with kids is what it’s all about. I’m in India working as the chief coach, doing what I love.”
PAUL VADEM: “I’m glad to see everyone. I have so many memories, the most memorable is seeing you, my boxing brothers. We trained together to make names for ourselves. We will always have this to go back on. I get emotional. It didn’t matter where you came from, your economical values, and we competed against each other. But at the end of the day we respected each other.
“I’m a speaker and author today. What I had learned in boxing is why I’m able to do what I do. Thanks. This is beautiful. I’m thankful to see you all.”
JAMES JOHNSON: “It’s amazing to see some of these faces, It’s great to see you, guys! I remember the Olympic Festival. Randall Crippen. He was talkative……I gave him a diploma at the end of the match.
“I broke my hand in competition and they wouldn’t let me fight. I did and I drew a hometown kid in (Worcester) Massachusetts, Bobby Harris, and won. With one hand, I lost in the final. It’s good to see you guys. I’m living in Flint, Michigan. I went on to get my college career and today I’m a network engineer.”
DEAN FLETCHER: “I was an amateur a long time. I have many memories, but one is the years I was on the Board of Directors as an athlete representative. Kids today, the reason you can’t fight twice a day is me.
“The traveling, I can’t let that go. When things aren’t going well, I think of my amateur days. Nothing but love for you guys.”
LARRY NICHOLSON: “My most memorable things is being the 1993 Boxer of the Year. I accomplished a lot. I won silver at the 1993 and 1994 World Championships. Should have been gold. You were great fighters and role models. I had an opportunity to go to college – North Michigan University – and I have a degree.
“I’m still involved in boxing today as head coach of the Michigan Golden Gloves. I’m very happy where I am right now. I didn’t go pro because I love amateur boxing, the discipline and life. I worked with three Olympic teams. We’ve done well as frat brothers.”
MARK LANTON: “It’s a pleasure to see everybody like this. My most memorable moment was winning the Western Trials. I was an Army soldier when I was an amateur fighter. In Iraq, sometimes, Frank Vassar kept in touch with me. I’m retired now from the military. I worked at the VA as a federal police officer. I’m totally retired. I coach kids at a local gym and I’m living the life in Orlando.
FRANK VASSAR: “Winning the US Olympic Sports Festival and National Golden Gloves in 1999 was my most memorable. I was in the Army, the National Guards, when I was boxing. I got commissioned in the Air Force. I did three combat tours and was injured. Crazy stuff. I’m glad I made it back. I always enjoyed going to tournaments and seeing you guys. I love all you guys.”
RICHARD BONDS: In 1989, I remember fighting Jeremy Williams. He was the best and that put me on the map. The next four years I was going to Colorado and that was the best. I was a college student and got a criminal justice degree at the University of Memphis. I met Echols at dual. We’d come together three or four times a year, maybe more and when you saw somebody it was like yesterday.
“In 1992, I wanted to make the Olympic team. I lost my first fight in Worcester and didn’t make it to the Olympics. There were only 12 weight classes and I was one of those guys. You are my frat brothers.”

and Montell Griffin.

 The group was comprised of 19 fighters who competed at the 1992 USA Olympic Trials, plus a few administrators, who happily spoke non-stop for an hour and 45 minutes. They gleefully reminisced, shared personal updates from the past 22 years, remembered their most memorable experiences as amateur boxers, and even got emotional at times as they rebounded. Some have kept in touch through emails and social media, but visibly seeing each other on the Zoom call was eye-opening for these ring brothers.

“You all are part of USA Boxing,” said call host Mike McAtee, Executive Director of USA Boxing. “Hector Colon and Raul Marquez got their brothers on this call. It was a natural fit. We have 13 kids getting ready to qualify in May for the Olympics. USA Boxing touches 36,000 kids every day. It changed our lives, and we can have an impact saving lives.

“It’s an honor seeing you all. You are the backbone of USA Boxing. Boxing made us who we are, you have inspired boxers. This was long overdue, and we plan to have reunions with other Olympic Trials classes in the future.”

“This is very cool to see everybody and I enjoy listening to you,” added Chris Cugliari, USA Boxing Alumni Association Director. “You’re all helping bring the spirit back to USA Boxing Alumni. Boxing people love being around boxing people, and that’s what the USA Boxing Alumni Association is all about. We’re bringing that spirit back. I love having you guys in our alumni program. This has been a blast!”

 “I’m not much of a boxer, but I’m happy to be part of this boxing program,” commented Barry Siff, USA Boxing volunteer marketing advisor. “I grew up in Detroit during the 1980’s and hung out at Kronk (Gym). I’m happy to be on this call. We all need to help Mike and the team going forward. Don’t wait until 2028 in Los Angeles. We have Tokyo next year and Paris in 2024. Kids can learn from you. I’m happy to be part of USA Boxing.”

                                                          FIGHTERS’ QUOTES

(Robert Allen and Tarick Salmaci were also on the call but unable to speak due to technical problems)

HECTOR COLON: “I love you guys. It’s been so long. I hope we can communicate like this more often. We need you all to support USA Boxing and USA Boxing Alumni. My first international fight was in Barbados and I knocked out my opponent in 26 seconds. I remember receiving the Adidas bag and shoes. It was such a special thing. I dreamed of making the Olympics and I should have, but I found God calling me away from the sport. I was proud watching you and I rooted for you.

“It’s great to be back in USA Boxing and giving back to USA Boxing, because it helped me become the person I am today. I could have gone the wrong way. Let’s do this again and keep giving back to our sports.”

RAUL MARQUEZ: “I’m very excited to be here. I feel honored and I’m probably the only one here who fought most of the guys here. I have a lot of memories. I’m honored to be here with you, my boxing family. It’s beautiful.

“Everybody here knows how hard it is to win a tournament. We know what it takes because we were all elite. We have to give back. I’m still involved in boxing.”

ORLANDO HARRIS: “I had the greatest time in USA Boxing. I started late. I fought once before I went into the military. I got better and learned how to fight in the military. I had to because I had to do good or go back to my unit. In ’04 I got into car accident. Everybody died but me. They say I’m disabled, but I’m not, I still coach boxing.”

PAULIE AYALA: “The ’92 Olympic Trials is my most memorable moment because I was there. In 1988, I lost in The Westerns in the semifinals and I left boxing. I wasn’t focused. I watched you people excel and didn’t fight again until 1992. I lost to Sergio (Reyes), who I had fought 16 times before that fight. I met a lot of you guys fighting in Russia. What’s inspiring is listening to all of you.”

MONTELL GRIFFIN: “I was late going to the rty, coming in 1991. I had two fights going into the Golden Gloves, but I lied and said I had 12 so I could fight in the opens. My first fight was in 1991. I had to fight the No. 1 guy, Jeremy Williams, to make the Olympic team. Those 1 ½ years as were the best of my life. I looked up to all of you guys and have respect for all.”

ANTWUN ECHOLS: “I made it to Team USA, and I was an Olympic alternate. Raul (Marquez), he likes to talk, and I was excited to fight him. I learned a lot. I love being with all the guys. Larry Nicholson took me under his wing. He talked to me daily. I was a young kid, and my family life wasn’t good. When I went to the ’92 championships, these people were my family.

“I was raw off the streets of Davenport (Iowa) and Larry took care of me…thank you. If it wasn’t for the people at the Olympic Center, I don’t know where I’d be today.”

DANNY RIOS: “In 1992, I lost in the semifinals of the US Championships. So, I had to win the Golden Gloves to go to the Olympics. At the Trials I won my first fight and lost my second. I later turned pro. I’m working security and helping to train fighters at a local gym. I hope to have my own gym. I’m glad to see you all after all these years.

SKIPPER KELP: “I’m in Vegas. I moved here when I was in the amateurs. The best thing was the camaraderie. We grew up together. Together, we came of age as teenagers and I met some of my best friends for life. We were all at the elite level, the best versus the best, and eventually we fought each other. I met a lot of guys in 1989 in Russia.

“I own Fight Capital Gym in Las Vegas. When you go to Vegas, call me and come to my gym. We have a brotherhood for life. Amateur boxing brings people together. To reconnect like this is awesome.”

DANELL NICHOLSON: “My most memorable moment was representing USA Boxing at the 1992 Olympics, because I became an Olympian and met all these great athletes. Meeting you is really my most memorable. You can’t beat boxing!”

RONALD SIMMS: “I was probably on the amateur team longer than anybody. I stayed on so long that I have a lot of memories. I was part of the 1988, 1992 and 1996 Olympic teams. I saw a lot of talent come through. I started in 1995; this sport is addictive and I’m still involved in amateur boxing. We still have the most talented kids in amateur boxing.

“My dream was to make the Olympic Team and I still haven’t made it. My goal was to be No. 1 and I was in 1995. Then, I wanted to quit, but my coach said it wasn’t the time. The lessons I learned from you guys and sharing with kids is what it’s all about. I’m in India working as the chief coach, doing what I love.”

PAUL VADEM: “I’m glad to see everyone. I have so many memories, the most memorable is seeing you, my boxing brothers. We trained together to make names for ourselves. We will always have this to go back on. I get emotional. It didn’t matter where you came from, your economical values, and we competed against each other. But at the end of the day we respected each other.

“I’m a speaker and author today. What I had learned in boxing is why I’m able to do what I do. Thanks. This is beautiful. I’m thankful to see you all.”

JAMES JOHNSON: “It’s amazing to see some of these faces, It’s great to see you, guys! I remember the Olympic Festival. Randall Crippen. He was talkative……I gave him a diploma at the end of the match.

“I broke my hand in competition and they wouldn’t let me fight. I did and I drew a hometown kid in (Worcester) Massachusetts, Bobby Harris, and won. With one hand, I lost in the final. It’s good to see you guys. I’m living in Flint, Michigan. I went on to get my college career and today I’m a network engineer.”

DEAN FLETCHER: “I was an amateur a long time. I have many memories, but one is the years I was on the Board of Directors as an athlete representative. Kids today, the reason you can’t fight twice a day is me.

“The traveling, I can’t let that go. When things aren’t going well, I think of my amateur days. Nothing but love for you guys.”

LARRY NICHOLSON: “My most memorable things is being the 1993 Boxer of the Year. I accomplished a lot. I won silver at the 1993 and 1994 World Championships. Should have been gold. You were great fighters and role models. I had an opportunity to go to college – North Michigan University – and I have a degree.

“I’m still involved in boxing today as head coach of the Michigan Golden Gloves. I’m very happy where I am right now. I didn’t go pro because I love amateur boxing, the discipline and life. I worked with three Olympic teams. We’ve done well as frat brothers.”

MARK LANTON: “It’s a pleasure to see everybody like this. My most memorable moment was winning the Western Trials. I was an Army soldier when I was an amateur fighter. In Iraq, sometimes, Frank Vassar kept in touch with me. I’m retired now from the military. I worked at the VA as a federal police officer. I’m totally retired. I coach kids at a local gym and I’m living the life in Orlando.

FRANK VASSAR: “Winning the US Olympic Sports Festival and National Golden Gloves in 1999 was my most memorable. I was in the Army, the National Guards, when I was boxing. I got commissioned in the Air Force. I did three combat tours and was injured. Crazy stuff. I’m glad I made it back. I always enjoyed going to tournaments and seeing you guys. I love all you guys.”

RICHARD BONDS: In 1989, I remember fighting Jeremy Williams. He was the best and that put me on the map. The next four years I was going to Colorado and that was the best. I was a college student and got a criminal justice degree at the University of Memphis. I met Echols at dual. We’d come together three or four times a year, maybe more and when you saw somebody it was like yesterday.

“In 1992, I wanted to make the Olympic team. I lost my first fight in Worcester and didn’t make it to the Olympics. There were only 12 weight classes and I was one of those guys. You are my frat brothers.”

PROMOTER LEWKOWICZ PETITIONS WBC TO ORDER IMMEDIATE JAVIER FORTUNA VS. DEVIN HANEY FIGHT FOR WBC LIGHTWEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP

This afternoon, Sampson Lewkowicz, promoter of two-time world champion and WBC #2 lightweight contender Javier “El Abejon” Fortuna (36-2-1, 25 KOs), is submitting a formal request to the WBC for them to order negotiations to begin immediately for Fortuna to face current WBC Lightweight Champion Devin Haney (25-0, 15 KOs).

In his request, Lewkowicz cites the extended series of cancelled and declined fights for his top-rated fighter:

  • After fighting his way to the #1 spot in the WBC ratings last November, Fortuna was supposed to face England’s Luke Campbell in April of this year for the vacant lightweight championship after champion Haney was sidelined by shoulder injury and named a “champion in recess.” However, the COVID-19 pandemic prevented the fight from happening and gave Haney adequate time to recover.
  • The WBC then reinstated Haney as champion and granted him a voluntary defense. They further mandated that Fortuna and Campbell meet for the WBC interim lightweight championship and then face the winner of Haney’s voluntary defense immediately after. That arrangement fell through though, when Campbell’s promoter, Eddie Hearn, announced he was planning to step over #1 contender Fortuna to make a fight between Haney and #2 contender Campbell.
  • With Fortuna now looking for a new opponent, representatives from Golden Boy Promotions offered him a fight against WBC #3-ranked Ryan Garcia, which Fortuna agreed to without hesitation, only to be later notified that “Kingry” didn’t want to face Fortuna.
  • Lewkowicz then arranged for Fortuna to face Jorge Linares (47-5, 29 KOs), the WBC #5 contender and a former featherweight, super featherweight and lightweight world champion for the WBC Diamond Belt in August. Unfortunately, Linares announced he had COVID-19 a couple weeks before the fight and it was also cancelled.
  • Since then, Haney has gone on to successfully make his voluntary defense against former champion Yuriorkis Gamboa in November and Ryan Garcia is set to face Luke Campbell in January of next year.
  • Fortuna, now the WBC #2 contender after the insertion of former champ Vasyl Lomachenko into the #1 spot, was finally able to find someone to fight and looked sensational this past weekend while stopping tough Mexican Antonio Lozada Torres in six rounds.

Given these circumstances, Team Fortuna believes they are justified in requesting the WBC to grant this request for an immediate Fortuna vs. Haney fight. Fortuna has been a #1 or #2 contender for over a year while lower-rated contenders have secured fights against each other. With Lomachenko tied up looking for a rematch against Teofimo Lopez, the Fortuna vs. Haney fight is a worthy matchup between champion and available top contender.

“Through his entire career, Javier Fortuna has fought anyone willing to fight,” said Lewkowicz. “He looked sensational beating Lozada on Saturday and has been a top contender for an exceptionally long time. He deserves an immediate shot at Devin Haney’s championship. I am sure the WBC will agree that the time has come for his long-awaited title challenge.

Undefeated WBC Youth World lightweight champion Jamaine “The Technician” Ortiz Missing Thanksgiving to fight on Tyson-Jones, Jr. card in L.A.

WORCESTER, Mass. (November 24, 2020) – Many if not most Americans will be enjoying a traditional Thanksgiving meal this Thursday, eating turkey, stuffing and pie, along with watching pro football all day and night. Not so, though, for undefeated lightweight prospect

Jamaine “The Technician” Ortiz (13-0, 7 KOs), who will be flying from Boston to Los Angeles, to fight on Saturday night’s high-profile Mike Tyson-Roy Jones, Jr. show at Staples Center.

Ortiz, the reigning World Boxing Council (WBC) Youth World lightweight champion, will take on Ugandan southpaw Sulaiman Segawa (13-2-1, 4 KOs), fighting out of Maryland, in an 8-round match for the vacant World Boxing Council (WBC) USNBC (U.S) lightweight title.  

The 24-year-old Ortiz will travel with his head coach, Rocky Gonzalez, and cut-man Kendrick Ball, who will fill in for “The Godfather of Worcester (MA), boxing,” Carlos Garcia. He will not travel cross-country during the COVID-19 pandemic because of his advanced age.   A National Golden Gloves Hall of Fame trainer, Garcia was Ortiz’ first boxing coach as an amateur, and he has worked his fellow Worcester resident’s corner during Ortiz’ 4 ½-year professional career.

“Carlos will be with us in spirit,” Ortiz said. “We understand. Fighting is my career and part of that is missing out on Thanksgiving this year. I’ll be eating on the plane. This is more important, just business, part of my job. It is what it is. I’m a big family person and I see them on a regular basis, not just on holidays. I’ll get to eat my turkey when I return home.”

Ortiz like most boxers hasn’t been active due to the pandemic. His last fight was this past February at home in Worcester when he stopped Luis Ronaldo Castillo (22-5) in the second round.

Segawa’s last fight was an 8-round split draw with Zhora Hamazaryan (9-1-1) in January. In 2018, he lost decisions to Abraham Nova (12-0) for the vacant NABA super featherweight title and William Foster (7-0) for the vacant crown. Ortiz knows both of those fighters well having defeated Nova in the amateurs and New Haven’s Foster is a fellow New Englander.

“He’s a tough dude,” Ortiz spoke about Segawa. “His fight with Nova was close (96-94, 96-94, 97-93). He took both the distance; they couldn’t take him down. And he’s beaten some undefeated fighters (10-0 Godwin Rosa, 6-0 Brian Gallegos).

“He’s a good fighter who can win rounds. A slick fighter, but he can be a little wild, and that can be dangerous. It’s going to be challenging for me. I need to be smart, listen, and be tight. I can’t get caught when he throws wild punches.”

Although Segawa is a replacement and the opposite of his original opponent, Jamaine isn’t overly concerned that Segawa is a southpaw, even though he’s only fought one lefty as a pro (Victor Rosas in 2018), because to some extent he is ambidextrous.

“Luckily,” Ortiz concluded, “I had good sparring with a southpaw. I fight left-handed a lot myself. I shoot basketballs left-handed, bat left-handed in baseball, and arm wrestled with my left hand. A friend just sent me a picture from 2007 and I was in a southpaw stance.”

Ortiz is promoted by Jimmy Burchfield (Classic Entertainment and Sports) and advised by Richard Shappy and Eddie Imondi.

40-0 Gilberto Ramirez returns to ring Dec. 18 vs. Alfonso Lopez on PPV

GALVESTON, Texas (November 23, 2020) – The long-awaited return of undefeated Gilberto “Zurdo” Ramirez (40-0, 26 KOs) will be Friday night, December 18, when he challenges North American Boxing Federation (NABF) light heavyweight Alfonso “El Tigre” Lopez (32-3, 25 KOs), live on pay per view from Galveston Island Convention Center in Galveston, Texas.

“Battle of Rio Grande” will be available for live viewing on digital, cable and satellite, starting at 8 p.m. ET / 5 p.m. PT, on pay per view for a suggested retail price of only $24.99. FITE TV will stream worldwide on the FITE app and website (www.FITE.tv) and Integrated Sports Media will distribute throughout North America via DirecTV, iN Demand, Vubiquity, and DISH in the United States, as well as in Canada on Shaw and SaskTel.

The main event fighters, Ramirez and Lopez, are co-promoters of “Battle of Rio Grande” under their promotional company names, respectively, Zurdo Promotions and El Tigre Promotions.

The 29-year-old Ramirez, fighting out of Mazatlán, Mexico, became the first Mexican super middleweight champion of the world in 2016, when he defeated defending World Boxing Organization (WBO) champion Arthur Abraham (44-4) by way of a 12-round unanimous decision. Ramirez successfully defended his world title against 33-4-1 Maksym Bursak (DEC12), 22-0 Jesse Hart (WDEC12), 25-0-1 Habif Ahmed (TKO6), 23-0 Roamer Alexis Angulo (DEC12) and 25-1 Hart (DEC12) in a rematch.

Ramirez’ last fight, his first as a light heavyweight, was last April in Los Angeles, in which “Zurdo” stopped 29-6-1 Tommy Karpency in four rounds. Ramirez then became a promotional free agent.

Lopez will be fighting close to his home in Huntsville, Texas. “El Tigre” will be riding a 10-fight win streak into the ring for the Dec. 18th 12-round main event. He hasn’t fought in 13 months, registering a 10-round decision over 19-9-1 Denis Grachev in Lopez’ first defense of the NABF title he captured in his previous fight with a fourth-round stoppage of 21-3 Alex Theran.

“I’m looking forward to hosting my first fight and appreciate all the support and love I’ve received from everybody,” Ramirez said. I want to give special thanks to FITE.TV, El Tigre Promotions, Be Def Sports, and the state of Texas for being great partners in this event. I know it’s been a long road to return, but I feel great having full control of my career and being able to fight whenever, wherever, and however, I want. As always, I appreciate my trainers – Julian ChuaJoel Flores, and Chris Wong – keeping me in shape since my last fight and I feel better than ever to step back in the ring. I’ll see you guys December 18th in Texas!”

World-rated heavyweight Michael “The Bounty” Hunter, of Las Vegas, will take on battle-tested veteran Chauncy “Hillyard Hammer” Welliver (57-13-5, 23 KOs), the former World Boxing Council (WBC) Continental Americas champion.

Hunter is rated among the top 10 in all four major sanctioning bodies — #4 International Boxing Federation (IBF), #7 WBO, #10 WBC and World Boxing Association – in addition to being ranked # 8 by The Ring independent magazine.

Hunter’s last action was a 12-round split draw a year ago in Saudi Arabia with Alexander Povetkin (35-2), the former world heavyweight champion and 2004 Olympic gold medalist. A decorated U.S. amateur boxer, Hunter’s lone loss as a professional was a 12-round unanimous decision in 2017 to another Olympic gold medalist (2012), defending champion Oleksandr Usyk (11-0), for the WBO World cruiserweight title.

ZACH PARKER TAKES ON CESAR NUNEZ ON BILLY JOE SAUNDERS V MARTIN MURRAY CARD

Following a stunning 11th round KO in his last fight, Zach Parker (19-0-13 KOs) will be looking to impress again as he defends his WBO International Super Middleweight title against Cesar Nunez (17-2-1-9KOs).

The fight takes place on December 4th at Wembley Arena and will be live on Sky Sports and DAZN.

Ranked second by the WBO, sitting behind only Canelo and Champion Saunders, Parker is on a journey towards a world title shot of his own.

Last time out Parker expertly dispatched highly rated Rohan Murdock, then unbeaten in 22, with a highlight reel knockout to claim the WBO International Super Middleweight Title.

Parker believes he’s in line to make another statement on Dec 4th.

“I’m here and I’m ready to go again” said Derby County fan Parker. “Everyone knows I’m in the game to win world titles and fight on big shows. I’m ranked by the WBO as Billy Joe Saunders mandatory, he knows who I am, and I’m coming for him.

It’s my dream to bring a World Title back to Derby and I’ve worked really hard with my team to get into a place where we’re not far from a shot at that.”

Promoter Nisse Sauerland says he can’t wait to see his charge in the ring again.

“Zach is one of the most exciting fighters in the super middleweight division and one that is within touching distance of world level fights. He’s shown on a number of occasions now that he’s got heart, he can box and most importantly he’s got big punching power, capable of finishing a fight with one punch. He’s on his way to the top and December 4th is another opportunity for him to show what he can do.”

Neil Marsh, Parker’s manager echoed the thoughts, while acknowledging the challenges the sport has faced this year.

“I’m delighted to see Zach out before Christmas in what’s been a difficult time for the sport, Zach is the real deal and a monster at super middleweight. In 2021 the kid will arrive with a bang on the world stage.

I’d like to thank the Sauerlands for the opportunity and thank Eddie Hearn and Matchroom for the place on the bill”

The card’s main event sees Billy Joe Saunders make the second defence of his WBO Super-Middleweight World Title against British rival Martin Murray at The SSE Arena, Wembley on Friday December 4th, live on Sky Sports and DAZN.

Covid changes card for BOXXER: Tuesday Fight Night

FIGHTERS ON WEIGHT BUT COVID CHANGES CARD
AT BOXXER: TUESDAY FIGHT NIGHT OFFICIAL WEIGH INS 

Zak Chelli gets new opponent for Super-Middleweight Tournament
as positive covid tests prompt two last-minute changes

Every fighter knows they need to expect the unexpected when they enter a BOXXER tournament, but the surprises started early for tomorrow night’s Super-Middleweight Tournament, which airs live from 8pm on BT Sports and ITV 4.

Tournament favourite Zak Chelli (7-1-1, 3 KO’s, picturedgot a new opponent just hours before today’s weigh-ins began, with Ben Ridings having tested positive for covid-19. His place will be taken by Vladimir ‘The Bulgarian Bull’ Georgiev (4-0) of Bulgaria for the first of the evening’s semi-final matches.

In the second semi-final, Harry Woods (4-0) weighed in at 12st 1lb 12oz to face will face Mike McGoldrick (6-0, 2 KO’s), who weighed in at 12st 1lb 14oz.

With both Woods and McGoldrick having joined the card last week, the tournament line-up now hosts no less than three fighters who have the chance to change their destinies live on national television this Tuesday.

Fan-favorite Florian ‘TNT’ Marku (6-0, 4 KO’s) hit the scales at 10st 6lbs 8oz and in peak condition to deliver his trademark brand of explosive aggression for a global legion of adoring fans.

Opposite him is London man Muma Mweemba (4-1, 2 KO’s), who hit the scales at 10st 6lbs 4oz. With half his wins coming by way of KO, he is no stranger to intense firefights himself – Tuesday night’s fight might be a quick one.

The card will open with Mikael Lawal (12-0, 7 KO’s), decisive fight-finisher and winner of a BOXXER eight-man cruiserweight tournament in 2019. He stepped on the scales at 14st 3lbs for his fight with two-time Southern Area Cruiserweight title challenger Ossie Jervier (6-13, 5 KO’s), who touched down at 14st 1lb.

Lawal has been steadily climbing the ranks and will go forward to a British Cruiserweight Title Eliminator fight if he wins here. He will enter the ring looking for another highlight-reel finish to extend his undefeated record.

A positive covid-19 test has also removed Derrick Osaze from the card. His bout with John Telford will be rescheduled for a future BOXXER event.
BOXXER: Tuesday Fight Night – Official Weigh In Results

Zak Chelli 12st 1lb 10oz
Vladimir Georgiev 11st 12lb 6oz

Harry Woods 12st 1lb 12oz
Mike McGoldrick 12st 1lb 14oz

Florian Marku 10st 6lbs 8oz
Muma Mweemba 10st 6lbs 4oz

Mikael Lawal 14st 3lbs
Ossie Jervier 14st 1lb
BOXXER: #TuesdayNightFightNight is presented in association with William Hill and Lucozade and will air live and simultaneously on BT Sport and ITV 4 from 8pm tomorrow, Tuesday November 10.

On-air talent for the evening will feature some household names from the sports world, including former champion Paulie Malignaggi and veteran analyst Steve Bunce. They will be joined by Layla Anna LeeSavage Dan and Will Perry.

With today’s changes, the full fight card is now as follows:
BOXXER
Tuesday 10th November
#TuesdayNightFight Night

SUPER-MIDDLEWEIGHT FOUR-MAN TOURNAMENT

Zak Chelli
Vladimir Georgiev

Harry Woods
Mike McGoldrick

UNDERCARD
All bouts 6 x 3 Minute Rounds

Florian Marku vs Muma Mweemba
Welterweight Contest

Mikael Lawal vs Ossie Jervier
Cruiserweight Contest

Ortiz, Gonzalez, Cusumano head west to join Tyson-Jones megacard in California CES Boxing’s top prospects prepare for opportunity of a lifetime

Photos courtesy of Will Paul FROM LEFT TO right, Jamaine Ortiz, Irvin Gonzalez Jr., and Juiseppe Cusumano return to the ring Saturday, November 28, 2020 in Los Angeles on the undercard of the highly-anticipated Mike Tyson-Roy Jones Jr. bout at The Staples Center. All three fighters, promoted by CES Boxing, will compete for separate WBC regional titles. Ortiz and Gonzalez are reigning Youth world champions in the lightweight and featherweight divisions, respectively. The card is available on pay per view or on the Triller app.
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Monday, November 9, 2020

Providence, RI (November 9, 2020) – CES Boxing is stepping into the producer’s booth for its latest endeavor, embarking on a new journey and teaming with global venture creation group Eros Innovations in the production of the upcoming “Iron” Mike TysonRoy Jones Jr. megabout later this month to provide the opportunity of a lifetime for three of its top fighters.

Under the guidance of CES Boxing president and CEO Jimmy Burchfield Sr., reigning WBC World Youth Champion and NABF No. 10-ranked lightweight Jamaine Ortiz (13-0, 7 KOs), current WBC World Youth Featherweight Champion Irvin Gonzalez Jr. (14-2, 11 KOs), and hard-hitting heavyweight contender Juiseppe Cusumano (18-3, 16 KOs) will compete in separate 8-round championship bouts Saturday, November 28 on the preliminary card of the Tyson-Jones Jr. showdown in Los Angeles, presented by Tyson’s Legends Only League in association with entertainment platform Triller.

The event will take place at the Staples Center two days after Thanksgiving with boxing legends Tyson and Jones headlining a star-studded fight card beginning live at 9 pm ET on pay per view via FITE TV, or on the newly-launched Triller app, available both on Apple or Android devices. Visit tysonontriller.com for more information.

Tyson, the youngest heavyweight world champion in boxing history and a dynamic box-office draw during his prime, returns to the ring for the first time since 2005 to face Jones, a pound-for-pound all-time great who boasts multiple world titles in four different weight classes.

Through CES Boxing’s collaboration with Eros, three of boxing’s top rising prospects will showcase their talents to a worldwide audience November 28. Ortiz, a Worcester, MA, native and 2015 National Golden Gloves silver medalist, battles 24-year-old Philadelphia native Nahir Albright (8-1, 2 KOs) for the WBC USNBC Silver Title.

The undefeated Ortiz captured the vacant WBC Youth title in 2019 and recently defended the belt in his 2020 debut at The Palladium in Worcester with a second-round knockout win over Mexican challenger Luis Ronaldo Castillo in February.

Ranked No. 9 among lightweights in the NABF, Ortiz enjoyed a stellar amateur career before making his professional debut in 2016, winning more than 100 fights and advancing to the semifinals of the U.S. Olympic Trials in Nevada. The 24-year-old right-hander is also an apprentice carpenter and member of the Local 107 carpenter’s union. In his third year as a pro, he won the Youth title with a dominant win over unbeaten California native Ricardo Quiroz, then blasted 15-4 Vitor Jones before piecing together another dominant against French challenger Romain Couture in August of 2019.

Cusumano, a winner of 16 of his last 18 bouts, faces Mississippi’s Nick Jones (9-3, 6 KOs), who has won his last two. The bout will be contested for the vacant WBC USNBC Heavyweight Title.

A native of Carini, Sicily fighting out of Danville, VA, the 6-foot-4 Cusumano won 13 consecutive bouts during an impressive stretch between 2012 and 2018, which included 11 knockouts – five in the first round. He joined CES Boxing in 2017 and made his promotional debut with a knockout win over Dan Biddle. Cusumano also notched impressive wins over 9-1-2 Fred Latham, whom he stopped in just under three minutes, and 8-3-1 southpaw Bernardo Marquez via fourth-round knockout. Since October, the heavy-handed Cusumano has lived and trained in Rhode Island under the tutelage of noted trainer Roland Estrada; and his son, former Olympian Jason “Big Six” Estrada.

Gonzalez, also from Worcester, battles undefeated Forth Worth, TX, prospect Edward Vazquez (8-0, 1 KO) for the vacant WBC USNBC Featherweight Title. The 24-year-old prospect signed a promotional agreement with CES Boxing in November and has since won back-to-back bouts, including a thrilling, sixth-round knockout victory over Yeuri Andujar to capture the WBC Youth title in February. Gonzalez amassed an amateur record of 90-15 and joined his CES Boxing stablemate, Ortiz, at the 2016 Olympic Trials in Nevada.

Vazquez earned his eighth win as a pro in September, recovering from an early knockdown to defeat Adan Ochoa by unanimous decision at the MGM Grand “Bubble” in Las Vegas live on ESPN. Nicknamed “Kid,” Vazquez began boxing at 8 years old, amassed an amateur record of 82-8 and advanced to the Junior Olympic semifinals before launching his pro career in 2016 under the guidance of Roy Jones Jr. Promotions.

In addition to the highly-anticipated Tyson-Jones exhibition bout, the main card November 28 features a cruiserweight showdown between unbeaten British prospect and internet personality Viddal Riley and former UFC mixed martial arts pro Rashad Coulter. YouTube sensation and unbeaten pro Jake Paul faces former NBA star and three-time Slam Dunk Contest winner Nate Robinson and former two-time world champion Badou Jack battles unbeaten California native Blake McKernan in an 8-round bout.

Visit CESBoxing.com for more information, or follow CES Boxing on FacebookInstagramTwitter at @CESBOXING.

INFORMATION

CES Boxing is one of the top promotions in the northeast and one of the few to successfully promote both mixed martial arts and professional boxing. Launched in 1992 by longtime boxing judge Jimmy Burchfield Sr., the promotion is the only in professional boxing to boast two reigning WBC Youth world champions in lightweight Jamaine Ortiz and featherweight Irvin Gonzalez. CES Boxing recently teamed with UFC Fight Pass, the world’s No. 1 streaming platform for combat sports, to showcase its events to a worldwide audience.

Mike Tyson’s Legends Only League is a sports league created and owned by Mike Tyson and Eros Innovations. The Legends Only League is a next-generation sports venture that provides full support and infrastructure to the world’s greatest athletes, bringing the best of the best back to the ring, onto the court, and back on the field. The league will span live sporting events including tennis, basketball, boxing, and more in addition to creating consumer products, live events, premium content, and full-service management for the greatest sports stars the globe has ever known.

Eros Innovations is a global venture creation group led by Sophie Watts that invests in and creates globally recognized businesses for celebrities across premium content, consumer products and live experiences. Owners of Eros Innovations include Eros Investments, a media and tech investment holding company whose affiliate companies include Eros Now, India’s leading OOT platform with 186 million registered users.

Triller is an entertainment platform built for creators. The app allows users to create music videos, skits, and lip-syncing videos containing background music. Launched in 2015 by co-founders David Leiberman and Sammy Rubin, Triller uses an AI-based video editing tool that automatically adds effects like overlays, fast or slow motion, and basic text to videos. Triller has more than 65 million active users and has been downloaded over 250 million times worldwide. It also boasts some big names among its users, like Cardi B, Chance the Rapper, DJ Khaled, Alicia Keys, and others. Triller is owned by Proxima Media, Sony Music Entertainment, Warner Music Group, and Universal Music Group with other investors like Snoop Dog, Kendrick Lamar, Lil Wayne, and The Weeknd.

Sa’Rai Brown-El : The future of women’s boxing

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (November 9, 2020) – The future of women’s boxing, perhaps, is 15-year-old Sa’Rai Brown-El, who has already captured top honors in 11 national and regional tournaments.

Since she started boxing in 2015, Sa’Rai has collected gold medals at the 2019 Junior Open, 2019 National PAL, 2019 & 2017 National Junior Olympics, 2017 Western Regional Open, and Eastern Regional Open in 2017, 2018 and 2019.

“I stayed focused and hungry and, most importantly, humble,” she spoke about her success in the junior division. “No matter how much you’ve accomplished or the number of accolades you’ve gotten, always stay hungry and always strive for more.”

Boxing started for her when she was 10, training at Lugo Boxing and Fitness in Marietta, Georgia. Prior to that in her native Albany (NY), she went to her uncle’s gym and found a pair of boxing gloves.

“I fell in love with boxing when I found that first pair of gloves,” Brown-El explained. “I first started boxing because, at that time, my dad didn’t agree with me. I saw a lot of people who didn’t agree with females competing in a male dominated sport, so I wanted to prove those people wrong. I just love boxing because my whole family boxes.

” The COVID-19 pandemic adversely effected most boxers, who were limited in terms of training and sparring, in addition to being shutout of tournaments. Brown-El, however, made the best of a bad situation, running miles with her siblings, cardio mitt work with her father, and much more.

Brown-El has her sights firmly set on the 2020 USA Boxing National Championships, December 5-12, at the Shreveport Convention Center in Shreveport, Louisiana.

“I am super excited and super focused on the National Championships,” she added. “I am fighting to get on the USA High Performance Team for my second year. I really want this and I will be working hard every day. My goal for now is to be on Team USA for the second time. I want to fight internationally and be Number 1 in the world.”

Brown-El has definitive long-range goals in boxing, starting with the Olympics and finishing as the face of women’s boxing.

“If I win a gold medal at the 2024 Olympics, maybe a second time in 2028, after that I think that will open up great opportunities for me,” the prodigy commented. “I think it’ll especially help me in the pro ranks. Winning a gold medal is my biggest goal right now.

“I want to be the greatest female boxer in the world. I want to be known and I want to make a statement for all females. I really want to shock the world. I eat, sleep, and breath boxing. This is not just a sport for me, this is a lifestyle.” Sa’Rai Brown-El is on a golden path to stardom. She represents the future!

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